Posted in ECJ Blogs
Coronavirus Advice for Creditors

During this unprecedented time of uncertainty, landlords, financial institutions, vendors, suppliers, and other creditors will undoubtedly be affected. Due to the closure of most businesses which are considered non-essential, it is inevitable that ordinary business obligations such as rent, payments for equipment or inventory financing, employees, and creditors will not be made. It is just a matter of time before business owners default, and creditors will be faced with a problem that unless immediately addressed will only become larger. Some of the obvious signs that a ...

COVID-19: How to Determine If Your Business Should Remain Open 

There is a fair amount of confusion among California businesses regarding Governor Newsom’s “stay home” order and which facilities should remain open.  Unfortunately, Executive Order N-33-20 does not provide much guidance. It does, however, refer to the list of federal government's critical infrastructure sectors posted by the Department of Homeland Security and except those individuals “needed to maintain the continuity of operations” of those sectors. In addition, the state’s website clarifies that critical government services, schools, childcare, and ...

What Employers Need To Know About The Families First Coronavirus Response Act

The coronavirus pandemic has presented challenges for employers trying to remain responsive to the crisis but also struggling to absorb the burden it has imposed on their businesses. With much anxiety, employers have also been anticipating a new law, H.R. 6201, to go into effect that would expand family and medical leave requirements to cover COVID-19. As of yesterday, Congress passed and President Trump signed the final version of H.R. 6201, titled the Families First Coronavirus Response Act.

The Act will take effect on April 1, 2020 and will remain effective until December 31 ...

Coronavirus And The Magic of The Furlough

As employers struggle to cope with the impact of coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19), we have encountered a surprising number of employers who have been led to believe that a “furlough” is an employer option that can be implemented without regard for various laws that might otherwise apply. It is not. To be blunt, while the term “furlough” seems to be a more employee-friendly word for what many employers are doing, there is no magic to it. Indeed, until the California Legislature or Congress pass more comprehensive COVID-19 relief legislation, employers must still comply with all ...

Urgent: Governor Newsom Issues Executive Order to Address Cal-Warn Concerns In Coronavirus Crisis 

In an effort to address some of the issues presented by California’s WARN Act in connection with the COVID-19 crisis, Governor Newsom has issued Executive Order N-31-20 partially suspending certain provisions of Cal-WARN.  As we reported here, the wording of California’s WARN Act exposes employers temporarily closing or engaging in layoffs due to COVID-19 to liability for back pay, the value of benefits, penalties of $500 per day and attorneys’ fees.  Unlike the federal WARN Act, California’s version has no exception for unforeseen business circumstances and requires ...

What Employers Should Know About The Coronavirus 

Given the level of concern regarding the coronavirus, providing employees with reliable information and establishing both a prevention plan and a plan to follow if illness occurs is a good way to avoid panic and help ensure a healthy workplace. 

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) recently held a press conference to provide an update on the current status of the coronavirus (COVID-19). The CDC published a fact sheet as well as steps to follow if you are sick with the coronavirus. Both publications can be distributed to employees along with a memo outlining steps for prevention and ...

Proposed Fair Scheduling Act of 2020 Will Impose Fines and Additional Pay for the Failure to Provide Advance Notice of Worker Schedules

Senate Bill 850, also referred to as the Fair Scheduling Act of 2020, would require grocery stores, restaurants and retail stores to provide employees with 21-day work schedules, at least seven calendar days in advance.

Employers must pay a worker not exempt from overtime a “modification pay” for each previously scheduled shift that the employer cancels or moves to another date or time, each previously unscheduled shift that the employer requires an employee to work, and for each on-call shift for which an employee is required to be available but is not called into work.  If less ...

California Legislature Scrambles to Amend AB 5, The Independent Contractor Disaster

Assembly Bill 5 became effective on January 1, 2020. The law purports to prevent the misclassification of employees as independent contractors by codifying the ABC test established by the California Supreme Court case of Dynamex Operations West, Inc. v. Superior Court of Los Angeles (2018) 4 Cal.5th 903, along with several other tests and requirements which apply to various types of business relationships. In short, the law is very confusing.  Indeed, by all accounts, AB 5 is flawed, perhaps seriously so. Several lawsuits have been filed to challenge its terms and the California ...

Can A Receiver Legally Divert Mail?

Q:  A bank obtained a judgment against me, as a result of a failed business venture. While I have a house, there is no equity above my homestead exemption. I’ve little else, although the bank’s attorney has repeatedly accused me of hiding assets and having interests in businesses and assets owned by my brother and uncle. The bank’s attorney was able to convince a judge to appoint a receiver “in aid of execution” to help the bank collect its judgment. I just found out the receiver has diverted all the mail that is delivered to my house, including not only mail addressed to me, but also ...

New Law Requires that California Employers Provide Two Different Notices of Any Deadline to Withdraw Funds from A Flexible Spending Account

Effective January 1, 2020, Assembly Bill 1554 requires that California employers notify employees who participate in a flexible spending account, including a dependent care flexible spending account, a health flexible spending account or adoption assistance flexible spending account, of any deadline to withdraw funds before the end of the plan year. More specifically, the law requires that two different forms of notices be delivered, one of which may be electronic. The forms of notice may include, but are not limited to the following: email, telephone, text message, postal mail ...

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