Senate Bill 621 Gives Part-Time Educators Their Proportional Share

Image result for educatorsSenate Bill 621 will become effective on January 1, 2018.  The bill amends Labor Code section 515.8 and is intended to address the ambiguities in Assembly Bill 2230 which was enacted last year.  AB 2230 had set a new earnings standards for designating private school teachers as exempt from overtime which were based on the employee earning a monthly salary equivalent to the greater of no less than the lowest salary offered by any school district or the equivalent of no less than 70% of the lowest schedule salary offered by the school district or county office of education in which the private elementary or secondary institution is located.  However, the earnings requirements established by AB 2230 neglected to address pay standards for part-time teachers in private schools.  SB 621 simply specifies that part-time private school teachers will be paid pursuant to the same proportional salary standards as their full-time counterparts.

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